EU Guidelines For Computerized System Part- 2

Project Phase

  1. Validation
    4.1 The validation documentation and reports should cover the relevant steps of the life cycle. Manufacturers should be able to justify their standards, protocols, acceptance criteria, procedures and records based on their risk assessment.

4.2 Validation documentation should include change control records (if applicable) and reports on any deviations observed during the validation process.
4.3 An up to date listing of all relevant systems and their GMP functionality (inventory)
should be available.
For critical systems an up to date system description detailing the physical and logical
arrangements, data flows and interfaces with other systems or processes, any hardware and software pre-requisites, and security measures should be available.
4.4 User Requirements Specifications should describe the required functions of the
computerised system and be based on documented risk assessment and GMP impact. User requirements should be traceable throughout the life-cycle.
4.5 The regulated user should take all reasonable steps, to ensure that the system has been developed in accordance with an appropriate quality management system. The supplier should be assessed appropriately.
4.6 For the validation of bespoke or customised computerised systems there should be a process in place that ensures the formal assessment and reporting of quality and performance measures for all the life-cycle stages of the system.
4.7 Evidence of appropriate test methods and test scenarios should be demonstrated.
Particularly, system (process) parameter limits, data limits and error handling should be considered. Automated testing tools and test environments should have documented assessments for their adequacy.
4.8 If data are transferred to another data format or system, validation should include checks that data are not altered in value and/or meaning during this migration process.

EU Guidelines For Computerized System Part -1

Principle
This annex applies to all forms of computerised systems used as part of a GMP regulated activities. A computerised system is a set of software and hardware components which together fulfill certain functionalities.
The application should be validated; IT infrastructure should be qualified.
Where a computerised system replaces a manual operation, there should be no resultant decrease in product quality, process control or quality assurance. There should be no increase in the overall risk of the process.


General

  1. Risk Management
    Risk management should be applied throughout the lifecycle of the computerised system taking into account patient safety, data integrity and product quality. As part of a risk management system, decisions on the extent of validation and data integrity controls should be based on a justified and documented risk assessment of the computerised system.
  2. Personnel
    There should be close cooperation between all relevant personnel such as Process Owner, System Owner, Qualified Persons and IT. All personnel should have appropriate qualifications, level of access and defined responsibilities to carry out their assigned duties.
  3. Suppliers and Service Providers
    3.1 When third parties (e.g. suppliers, service providers) are used e.g. to provide, install, configure, integrate, validate, maintain (e.g. via remote access), modify or retain a computerised system or related service or for data processing, formal agreements must exist between the manufacturer and any third parties, and these agreements should include clear statements of the responsibilities of the third party. IT-departments should be considered analogous.
    3.2 The competence and reliability of a supplier are key factors when selecting a product or service provider. The need for an audit should be based on a risk assessment.
    3.3 Documentation supplied with commercial off-the-shelf products should be reviewed by regulated users to check that user requirements are fulfilled.
    3.4 Quality system and audit information relating to suppliers or developers of software and implemented systems should be made available to inspectors on request.